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Braces

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Braces and orthodontic treatment are used to correct “bad bites,” or malocclusion (teeth that are crowded or crooked). In some cases your teeth may be straight, but your upper and lower jaws may not meet properly. These jaw or tooth alignment problems may be inherited or could result from injury, early or late tooth loss, or thumbsucking. If you have an abnormal bite your dentist may recommend braces or another orthodontic treatment to straighten out your smile. Correcting the problem can create a nice-looking smile, but more importantly, orthodontic treatment results in a healthier mouth. Not correcting an abnormal bite could result in further oral health problems, including: tooth decay gum disease tooth loss affected speech and/or chewing abnormal wear to tooth enamel jaw problems
Straightening your teeth can be accomplished in different ways. The kind of orthodontic treatment you have will depend on your preference and the options provided by your dentist or orthodontist. Tradition…

Braces: How Braces Work, Pain Relief, & Keeping Braces Clean

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Braces can correct misaligned teeth to improve your smile and your dental health, but braces pain can make you uncomfortable. How Braces WorkKnowing a bit about how braces work can help you prepare for the braces pain you might experience. Braces place continuous pressure on the teeth to slowly move them into a different position. The key components of braces are:Brackets: A bracket is attached to each tooth or to a band placed around the tooth. Brackets hold the wires that actually cause the teeth to move. Braces pain associated with brackets may include pain from the band or the brackets.Wires: The wires used for braces are known as arch wires. They are attached to the brackets, and an orthodontist adjusts them at regular visits. Sometimes braces pain occurs soon after the braces are adjusted.Benefits Of BracesBraces pain can be uncomfortable, but wearing braces to improve your bite can help to eliminate other types of mouth and tooth pain caused by misaligned teeth. Other benefits o…

How To Limit The Effects Of Sugar On Teeth

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Cookies, cakes, candies and sodas – everywhere you go, there are sugary treats to tempt you and your kids. The effects of sugar on teeth may not be noticeable right away, but too much can lead to tooth decay if you don't stay on top of it. Here's how sugar can harm your family's dental health and what you can do to prevent it.
Acid Attacks
When you eat or drink sugary foods – refined, processed or in the form of carbohydrates – you're feeding the beast. Bacteria in your mouth digest the foods you eat and specifically feed on the sugar, producing acids that can slowly dissolve tooth enamel and cause tooth decay. According to the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR), these acids do the most damage to your teeth for 20 minutes after eating; this is what is known as an "acid attack." So the more sugary foods you eat throughout the day, the more your teeth are exposed to decay-causing acids.
Sensible Food Choices
What can you do to protect yo…

Plaque

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Your teeth are covered with a sticky film called plaque that can contribute to tooth decay and gum disease. Plaque contains bacteria, which following a meal or snack containing sugar can release acids that attack tooth enamel. Repeated attacks can cause the enamel to break down, eventually resulting in cavities. Plaque that is not removed with thorough daily brushing and cleaning between teeth can eventually harden into calculus or tartar. This makes it more difficult to keep your teeth clean. When tartar collects above the gum line, the gum tissue can become swollen and may bleed easily. This is called gingivitis, the early stage of gum disease. You can prevent plaque buildup and keep your teeth cavity-free by regularly visiting the dentist, brushing twice a day with a fluoride toothpaste and cleaning between your teeth with dental floss daily.
To read the entire article visit MouthHealthy.org
Vista Dental Care Chad Aitken, DMD
280-5201 43 St.
Red Deer, AB
T4N 1C7
(855) 636-9223
VistaDentalCa…

Mouth Sores

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Dental health is not limited to your teeth. Sores or irritations can develop in and around the mouth. Fortunately, they usually heal on their own within a week or two. Mouth sores come in several different varieties and can have any number of causes, including: Infections from bacteria, viruses or fungusIrritation from a loose orthodontic wire, a denture that doesn’t fit, or a sharp edge from a broken tooth or filling.The symptom of a disease or disorder.
Your dentist should examine any mouth sore that lasts a week or longer. For more information about specific kinds of mouth sores, please visit our pages on canker sores, cold sores, oral thrush and leukoplakia.

To read the entire article visit MouthHealthy.org
Vista Dental Care Chad Aitken, DMD280-5201 43 St.Red Deer, ABT4N 1C7(855) 636-9223   VistaDentalCare.ca

How to Get Rid of Bad Breath?

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How to Get Rid of Bad Breath? What is Halitosis? Halitosis is the medical term for bad breath, and if you’ve ever had it, you shouldn’t feel bad. About 1 in 5 people in the general population suffer from it, and many people who think they have it actually do not.
The paranoia probably stems from the social stigma people place on those who have bad breath. In some cases, the causes of bad breath are simple and preventable so others are quick to judge, but there are rare exceptions in which someone’s halitosis may actually require medical attention. Knowing what causes bad breath can help identify the difference. In most cases, bad breath isn’t serious, but if it lasts longer than a few weeks, it may be evidence of a deeper underlying problem.
Bad Breath Causes In order to get rid of bad breath, the first thing you need to know is why it’s happening. There are basically 10 common causes of bad breath: Drinking and Eating Certain Foods and Drinks: Certain drinks and foods, particularly coffee…

Gum Disease and Its Causes

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Gingivitis is the early stage of gum disease. Gum disease, also known as periodontal disease, is an infection of the tissues that surround your teeth, and is caused by a buildup of plaque. In its early stages, symptoms may include:
gums that bleed easilyred, swollen, tender gumsbad breath
Some factors that can put you at higher risk of developing gingivitis include:
poor dental caresmoking or chewing tobacco genetics crooked teeth that are hard to keep clean pregnancy diabetes medications, including steroids, certain types of anti-epilepsy drugs, cancer therapy drugs, some calcium channel blockers and oral contraceptives
This might sound scary, but at this stage the disease is still reversible. Eliminating the infection can be as easy as trip to the dentist office for a professional cleaning, as well as daily brushing and flossing.
Because gum disease is usually painless, you may not know you have it. This is why it’s important to schedule regular dental checkups in addition to maintaining…