Posts

Water Flossing

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Below is an excerpt from an article found on mouthhealthy.org

Water flossing is a way to clean between and around your teeth. A water flosser is a handheld device that sprays streams of water in steady pulses. The water, like traditional floss, removes food from between teeth.  Water flossers that have earned the ADA Seal of Acceptance have been tested to be safe and effective at removing a sticky film called plaque, which puts you at a higher risk for cavities and gum disease. Water flossers with the ADA Seal can also help reduce gingivitis, the early form of gum disease, throughout your mouth and between your teeth. Get a list of all ADA-Accepted water flossers. Water flossers can be an option for people who have trouble flossing by hand. People who have had dental work that makes flossing difficult—like braces, or permanent or fixed bridges—also might try water flossers.  Cleaning between your teeth once a day is an important part of your dental hygiene routine. You should also brush y…

Dental Anesthesia Side Effects And Causes For Treatment

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Below is an excerpt from an article found oncolgate.com

Medical procedures are sometimes necessary to maintain your health, including oral health. Anesthesia is inherent to more involved procedures, whether it's knee surgery or filling an advanced cavity, and when properly administered, it isn't a point of concern. But some people do suffer from dental anesthesia side effects. Here's a look into anesthesia and why some patients don't respond as well to it. Anesthesia Types There are two types of anesthesia: local and general. The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD) defines local anesthesia as "the temporary loss of sensation including pain in one part of the body produced by a topically-applied or injected agent without depressing the level of consciousness." In effect, your dentist simply desensitizes a portion of your mouth by injecting medicine into the gum or inner cheek; you can stay awake for this process. General anesthesia, according to Aetna,…

New Year, Healthier Mouth

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Below is an excerpt from an article found on mouthhealthy.org

What does ringing in the new year have to do with being mouth healthy? 
More than you may think. Did you know that you should replace your toothbrush every three to four months? Bristles that become frayed and worn are less effective at cleaning your teeth. That means, celebrating the new year with a brand new toothbrush is actually smart dental hygiene.
Here are MouthHealthy resolutions: Start brushing 2min2x. Always brush twice a day for two minutes for healthier teeth, good breath, fewer cavities, and to avoid painful dental problems. Floss daily. Flossing is part of being mouth healthy.Chew sugarless gum. Chewing sugarless gum for 20 minutes following meals can help prevent tooth decay.Eat a healthy diet. Eat a balanced diet and limit between-meal snacks.Drink fluoridated water. Fluoride helps prevent cavities by making teeth more resistant to the acid attacks that cause cavities.See your dentist. Regular dental visits will…

Finding A Dentist

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Below is an excerpt from an article found on colgate.com


How Do I Look for a Dentist?  A good place to start is by asking for a referral from people you trust — your friends, family, acquaintances, work associates, pharmacist or family doctor. Ask them how long they've gone to their dentist, how comfortable they feel asking questions, what type of dentist they go to (general or specialist). It is important that you find a dentist with whom you feel comfortable. Other ways to find a dentist include: Calling your local dental society for a list of recommended dentists in your area. Your local dental society can be found in the Yellow Pages under "dentist."Searching online for dentists in your area. More and more dentists have websites explaining their approach and treatment methods.What Kind of Dentist Should I Look for? General dentists are trained to do all types of treatment. If you have difficult or unusual problems, your dentist may refer you to one of the following specia…

Brown Teeth: Causes and How to Remove Brown Stains on Teeth

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Below is an excerpt from an article found on crest.com

What Causes Brown Teeth Stains?Brown teeth stains are not uncommon, and they have many causes, including diet and medications. But smoking is one of the top causes of brown teeth stains. Constant exposure to the nicotine in cigarettes over time creates brown teeth stains that can get in the way of an attractive smile. There are many other causes of tooth discoloration and the appearance of brown teeth—heredity, trauma or illness, certain medications, food and drink stains, poor oral hygiene ... the list goes on. While you can't control all of these causes of brown teeth, it’s important to focus on the ones you can since oral health has a significant impact on your overall health. How to Remove Brown Stains from TeethBrown teeth stains often respond well to teeth whitening systems. If you have brown teeth stains due to smoking, a combination of products including those from the Crest 3D White collection, may help reduce brown tee…

Tooth Anatomy: Know The Parts Of Your Teeth

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Have you ever wondered what makes up a tooth? Each part of a tooth has unique functions and properties. Aetna's Simple Steps to Better Dental Health lists major parts of tooth anatomy, including enamel, dentin, cementum, root(s) and the root canal chamber(s) inside the tooth. Damaged teeth, especially teeth with cracked or eroded enamel, are very susceptible to cavities. Advanced gum disease, another oral health condition that threatens tooth health, attacks the bone of the teeth and may cause tooth loss. Understanding the function of each part of a tooth and the steps required to keep teeth healthy with home care and regular checkups are important components of oral health education for you and your family. Tooth Enamel Tooth enamel is a protective barrier that surrounds the visible part of the tooth. It is composed of strong minerals, including calcium phosphate. Tooth enamel is the hardest substance in the human body, and healthy enamel is resistant to cavity-causing bacteria. Be…

Cavity Fillings: What to Expect, Types & Potential Problems

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The process of filling cavities is a fairly simple and straightforward one that can be done right at your dentist's office. Filling Cavities: What to ExpectYou should expect to be at your dentist's office for around an hour. This gives him or her enough time to take x-rays if needed, talk to you about the procedure and complete the dental work. Before filling cavities, your dentist will numb your teeth, gums and surrounding skin to avoid and lessen discomfort during the procedure. Next, he or she will drill out the decay in the tooth and replace it with a filling. This process only takes a few minutes. Once you're done, your mouth will probably remain numb for a few more hours. There aren’t any significant risks associated with filling cavities, but be sure to keep your dentist’s contact information on hand in case you have any questions or complications. The most common use of tooth fillings is to fill a cavity in the tooth. But tooth fillings also can be used to repair dama…