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Tooth Extraction: Procedure, Healing, & Complications

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Below is an excerpt from an article found on crest.com

A tooth extraction is an outpatient procedure performed by a dentist. In some cases pulling teeth (removing a tooth completely from its spot in the jaw bone), may be necessary to preserve or improve your dental health.
Some of the reasons for tooth extraction include: Pulling teeth for braces: Preparation for orthodontia (braces and retainers) often involves pulling one tooth or a few teeth.Pulling teeth to save space:Wisdom teeth are often removed if there is no space for them in the mouth, or if they become impacted or infected.Pulling teeth due to damage or decay: Tooth extraction may be the only option if a tooth is too decayed or damaged to be repaired with a filling or crown.Pulling teeth in radiation or chemotherapy patients: If radiation or chemotherapy to the head and neck causes teeth to become infected, pulling teeth may be necessary.Tooth Extraction Procedure: Getting a Tooth Pulled When you undergo a tooth extraction proc…

What Can You Do About Missing Teeth?

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Below is an excerpt from an article found oncolgate.com

If you don't quite have a full set of permanent teeth, you might be surprised to learn that you're in good company. In fact, the average adult who is between the ages of 20 and 64 has at least three decayed or missing teeth, according to the American Dental Association (ADA). Whether you lost your teeth in an accident or you had them pulled, replacement teeth not only have the potential to enhance your appearance, but they may also improve your chewing and speaking. Take a look at some of the tooth replacement options your dental health care professional might recommend for you. Dental Implants Because it is surgically implanted, a dental implant can offer a sturdy, long-term solution for a tooth replacement. The process of getting an implant involves three stages that can take place over several months. Despite this lengthy time frame, many people choose dental implants because they're the most similar to natural teeth a…

Temporomandibular Joints Pain (TMJ)

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Below is an excerpt from an article found on mouthhealthy.org

The temporomandibular joints, called TMJ, are the joints and jaw muscles that make it possible to open and close your mouth. Located on each side of the head, your TMJ work together when you chew, speak or swallow and include muscles and ligaments as well as the jaw bone. They also control the lower jaw (mandible) as it moves forward, backward and side to side. Each TMJ has a disc between the ball and socket. The disc cushions the load while enabling the jaw to open widely and rotate or glide. Any problem that prevents this complex system of muscles, ligaments, discs and bones from working properly may result in a painful TMJ disorder.  Possible causes of TMJ disorders include:arthritis dislocation injury tooth and jaw alignment stress and teeth grinding Diagnosis is an important step before treatment. Part of the dental examination includes checking the joints and muscles for tenderness, clicking, popping or difficulty moving…

Dental Fluorosis: Causes, Treatments & Prevention

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Below is an excerpt from an article found on crest.com

Dental flourosis (pronounced “floo-roh-sis”) is a common condition that can affect the appearance of children’s teeth due to the hypocalcification of tooth enamel. What is hypocalcification? It’s merely the scientific term for having less than normal amounts of calcification in the teeth, leading to spots of softer enamel and discoloration. Most cases of fluorosis are mild and do not affect tooth function or cause pain, though in rare severe cases the enamel itself is affected with pitting and brown spots that aren’t as easily treated. Adults aren’t affected by fluorosis, but if you suspect that your child may have a severe form of fluorosis, see a dentist as soon as possible. What causes Dental Fluorosis? Sometimes called mottled enamel or enamel fluorosis, dental fluorosis occurs due to the sustained overconsumption of fluoride when the enamel layers of permanent teeth are being formed, even before they’re visible. This can happen b…

Water Flossing

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Below is an excerpt from an article found on mouthhealthy.org

Water flossing is a way to clean between and around your teeth. A water flosser is a handheld device that sprays streams of water in steady pulses. The water, like traditional floss, removes food from between teeth.  Water flossers that have earned the ADA Seal of Acceptance have been tested to be safe and effective at removing a sticky film called plaque, which puts you at a higher risk for cavities and gum disease. Water flossers with the ADA Seal can also help reduce gingivitis, the early form of gum disease, throughout your mouth and between your teeth. Get a list of all ADA-Accepted water flossers. Water flossers can be an option for people who have trouble flossing by hand. People who have had dental work that makes flossing difficult—like braces, or permanent or fixed bridges—also might try water flossers.  Cleaning between your teeth once a day is an important part of your dental hygiene routine. You should also brush y…

Dental Anesthesia Side Effects And Causes For Treatment

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Below is an excerpt from an article found oncolgate.com

Medical procedures are sometimes necessary to maintain your health, including oral health. Anesthesia is inherent to more involved procedures, whether it's knee surgery or filling an advanced cavity, and when properly administered, it isn't a point of concern. But some people do suffer from dental anesthesia side effects. Here's a look into anesthesia and why some patients don't respond as well to it. Anesthesia Types There are two types of anesthesia: local and general. The American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD) defines local anesthesia as "the temporary loss of sensation including pain in one part of the body produced by a topically-applied or injected agent without depressing the level of consciousness." In effect, your dentist simply desensitizes a portion of your mouth by injecting medicine into the gum or inner cheek; you can stay awake for this process. General anesthesia, according to Aetna,…

New Year, Healthier Mouth

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Below is an excerpt from an article found on mouthhealthy.org

What does ringing in the new year have to do with being mouth healthy? 
More than you may think. Did you know that you should replace your toothbrush every three to four months? Bristles that become frayed and worn are less effective at cleaning your teeth. That means, celebrating the new year with a brand new toothbrush is actually smart dental hygiene.
Here are MouthHealthy resolutions: Start brushing 2min2x. Always brush twice a day for two minutes for healthier teeth, good breath, fewer cavities, and to avoid painful dental problems. Floss daily. Flossing is part of being mouth healthy.Chew sugarless gum. Chewing sugarless gum for 20 minutes following meals can help prevent tooth decay.Eat a healthy diet. Eat a balanced diet and limit between-meal snacks.Drink fluoridated water. Fluoride helps prevent cavities by making teeth more resistant to the acid attacks that cause cavities.See your dentist. Regular dental visits will…